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What’s Next for Equity in Education? (presentation)

Presentation slides from What’s Next for Equity in Education? hosted by the Equity Initiative at Save the Children on November 6, 2018. Participants heard from leading Equity Initiative members on their efforts to generate data and evidence on equity at both a systems level and at a programmatic level for teaching and learning.

Year Published: 2018

Author(s): Education Equity Research Initiative

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